Illinois Ave Urban Farm

Illinois Ave Urban Farm Looking for healthy heirloom and specialty vegetables and flowers grown in the living soil of our urban Bemiss/Logan/Chief Garry Park neighborhood?
(1)

Freshly picked, beyond organic produce grown right in our northside Spokane Washington USA neighborhood. This page and our stand offer the seasonal bounty of the Earth, unusual and heirloom produce, occasional culinary recipes old and new, a little bit of local food network philosophy and classes, and hope for a more sustainable future amidst an increasingly urbanized global environment.

Freshly picked, beyond organic produce grown right in our northside Spokane Washington USA neighborhood. This page and our stand offer the seasonal bounty of the Earth, unusual and heirloom produce, occasional culinary recipes old and new, a little bit of local food network philosophy and classes, and hope for a more sustainable future amidst an increasingly urbanized global environment.

Operating as usual

This is one of the more challenging pieces that I have ever written. Grieving is somewhat complicated when it is entangl...
06/14/2021

This is one of the more challenging pieces that I have ever written. Grieving is somewhat complicated when it is entangled with the loss of a beloved only child, an urban family farm lifeway, a “complex” “carbon” and “moral” calculation, existential crisis, hope for the future, and sense of community. Jozef gave us hope for our world’s sustainable future. Like all farmers, urban and rural, farmstand sales and celebrating food were deeply interwoven with our family’s lifeway and community. We miss you, Jozef Callum Sloma (1999-2021).

04/20/2021

Farm stand closed until further notice. Family member vehicle accident. Good thoughts and prayers.

One of our own inspirations has been Rosalind Creasy, the author of Edible Landscaping, gorgeous cookbook series "Edible...
04/18/2021

One of our own inspirations has been Rosalind Creasy, the author of Edible Landscaping, gorgeous cookbook series "Edible Asian Garden" and more, and a slew of other resources. Creasy helped kick off a movement (thanks to The Inland Empire Gardeners she spoke once in the valley) to turn our front yards into meals for our tables and aesthetic food for neighborhood beautification. One edible landscaper calls this "landscaping with intention." https://www.tenthacrefarm.com/see-how-easily-you-can-create-an-edible-landscape/

However, many of us struggle to recycle paved or gravel driveways and empty lots into productive and aesthetically pleasing urban food space. Here's a post from the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library about tillage radishes that should inspire! p.s., Inland Northwest Community Gardens - INCG and Master Gardeners of Spokane County - WSU used tillage radishes on old packed parking lot gravel over at Chief Garry Community Garden - but perhaps next time we will have a grander parquet floor vision in mind?

03/11/2021

One of the reasons that I

What is your favorite type of composting during the winter? Here at Illinois Ave Urban Farm, we adore sheet composting o...
02/07/2021

What is your favorite type of composting during the winter? Here at Illinois Ave Urban Farm, we adore sheet composting on the outdoor garden beds, outdoor passive composting in our two bin GEOBIN Composting System (free from Spokane County Master Composters/Recyclers during the compost fairs to residents), and indoor worm bins. Like the Master Gardeners of Spokane County - WSU recommend, our red wrigglers are warm and cozy and well-behaved in the basement.

INDOOR VERMICOMPOSTING IS FUN, EASY, AND KID FRIENDLY

Composting indoors with worms (also called vermicomposting) is an easy and effective way to recycle kitchen scraps and receive "black gold" worm castings in return. It’s also a great project for kids. It's especially convenient in the winter when a trip to the compost pile may require putting on snow boots and gloves and carrying buckets or bowls of veggie peelings to the far end of the garden. Worm bins by contract are best located conveniently in the basement. A well-tended bin does not smell and can be located under the sink or in a closet, but basements tend to be a bit cooler and easier to keep dark.

According to Oregon State University's publication linked below, "Most food waste in the United States is sent to landfills and makes up 20 percent (by weight) of all landfill materials. When this food decomposes in a landfill, it produces methane gas. Methane is a greenhouse gas (a gas that traps heat in the atmosphere). Methane is about 20 times more potent than carbon dioxide, in terms of its warming potential." Vermicomposting recycles organic waste and solves this problem with landfill gas and also produces a wonderful product for our gardens and houseplants.

The red wiggler worms that are recommended for indoor composting are well behaved small worms that don't need much attention or equipment. The species usually recommended is the common red wiggler species (Eisenia fetida). You can purchase this worm species online and we do have at least one local vermicomposting supplier in Otis Orchards. The red wiggler’s digestive system is good at converting food waste and other organic materials into nutrient-rich compost. It is best to purchase a pound or two of this species to get a bin started. They will soon multiply and you can gift worms to your friends so they can start a bin. Do not use worms from your garden for indoor composting.

Expensive worm hotels advertised in garden supply catalogs are not required. Inexpensive plastic opaque storage bins found at most big box stores can be modified within minutes to provide a good home. Worm bins need drainage holes and holes for air circulation so a few minutes with a drill is all that is needed to prepare the bin. Fill the bin halfway with bedding material such as newspaper, coconut coir, or paper egg crates torn into small pieces. Avoid shredded copy paper and magazine coated papers.

The worms will eat most fruit and vegetable waste with a few exceptions. Citrus fruits like lemon and oranges, vegetables in the onion and garlic families, and processed foods of all kinds should be avoided. The same rules apply to indoor vermicomposting as regular outdoor composting, no meat, dairy, or grease. Whether or not coffee grounds should be used as food for indoor worms is currently being debated. While appropriate in moderation for large composting piles, the issue in a small bin is more about the texture of the grounds which can be abrasive to the worms' skin. Cantaloupe and watermelon rinds seem to be a favorite, but they add lots of moisture so don't overload them. Potatoes are okay but the worms don't seem to enjoy them and will leave them until everything else is consumed. Chopping food items into small pieces (½ to1 inch or smaller) ensures faster breakdown by microorganisms and prevents the bin from getting moldy or smelly.

OSU has a good fact-sheet on vermicomposting:
https://catalog.extension.oregonstate.edu/em9034

BROCHURE TO GET YOU STARTED
https://www.spokanecounty.org/.../Composting-With-Worms-PDF

MBS

In the winter, I'm often busy recycling lavender buds into hand-embroidered, hand stuffed sachets for the Illinois Ave U...
01/17/2021

In the winter, I'm often busy recycling lavender buds into hand-embroidered, hand stuffed sachets for the Illinois Ave Urban Farm Stand. This free-hand embroidered textile art celebrates Earth as a flourishing garden that gives us life and joy. The fragrant sachets are hand-stuffed with our own "Beyond Organic" (#RegenerativeAgriculture) dried lavender. The fragrance recalls the beauty of summer, aids restful sleep, and naturally repels insects from dresser drawers and closets. Put them in your car or home for a natural air freshener.

During COVID-19, these unique and colorful hand-embroidered sachets are available delivered to your door in the Bemiss, Logan, Minnehaha, and Chief Garry neighborhoods or for curbside pickup at here 1817 E. Illinois. Just contact me through the website. Also, don't miss the new "For Sale" deals on selected bookmarks and sachets.

Unless otherwise marked, all sachets are worked on 100% biodegradable natural fabrics such as wool felt sourced from Weir Crafts or recycled plastic felt from Kunin Felt Products. Your #BuyLocal dollars spent smelling the lavender flowers helps grow a resilient, sustainable economy through what is termed a #LocalMultiplierEffect.

If you do ever get tired of the 100% natural fabrics hand-embroidered sachets or believe they are losing their effectiveness, just toss the whole into your compost bin, as I use the environmentally friendly Oeko-Tex® certified embroidery floss. Sachets or bookmarks made of recycled plastic felt, especially with embroidery picked out in reflective gold floss, should be disposed of safely after the end of its useful life (after emptying any lavender into your compost to close the recycling loop).

As many of you know, I am passionate about sustainability and growing a more regenerative economy. My entire family has made a commitment to managing our #SustainableLocalFood business a low waste as we can here at our tiny urban Food Not Lawns yarden. For more on regenerative agriculture, composting, or how living soils sequester greenhouse gas and cool our planet, you may be able to catch one of my classes through Master Gardeners of Spokane County - WSU, Spokane County Master Composters/Recyclers, or Inland Northwest Community Gardens - INCG. I hope that you too are passionate about Earth's gifts!

Last call for Red Fuseau sunchokes packed in 1 pound bags, with serving suggestions/recipe cards attached. They are now ...
11/14/2020

Last call for Red Fuseau sunchokes packed in 1 pound bags, with serving suggestions/recipe cards attached. They are now discounted to $6.10 each. We will deliver orders in the Logan/Bemiss/Chief Garry neighborhoods. Pickup only (message me to set a time) otherwise. p.s., We are all out of the White Fuseau sunchoke harvest now.

11/11/2020

As one veteran on this day that was traditionally honored as Armistice Day, to countless others who have served, and their families, "thank you for your service." Like reporter Richard Czaplinski, President Eisenhower, and the Vermont Ecumenical Council, I wonder what has happened to turn us from our dedication "to the cause of world peace"? Let's seek to reclaim Armistice Day https://vtdigger.org/2019/11/07/richard-czaplinski-what-happened-to-armistice-day/, https://vecncc.org/event/armistice-day-100th-anniversary/, and Veterans For Peace. One way to do so best is to celebrate local gardens that serve veterans and regrow community health. Thank you all veterans everywhere and Inland Northwest Community Gardens - INCG.

For a short window this week, we are excited that our late fall harvest of sunchokes, skirrets, rare Jaune du Poitou lee...
11/10/2020

For a short window this week, we are excited that our late fall harvest of sunchokes, skirrets, rare Jaune du Poitou leek pearls, and celeriac is now available over at Spokane Real Food Co-op. Recipe cards for serving and cooking will be attached. Our hyper-seasonal harvest will be available for pickup this Friday October 13th along with a yummy butter buy from Larsen's Creamery. Lots of other local organic produce available at near wholesale discounts through this community food buyer's cooperative, too! Register as a member and participate in a buy through https://foodclub.org/spokanerfbcoop/index

Illinois Ave Urban Farm Stand's umbrella is no longer out for the season. However, we are still open by appointment or c...
11/06/2020

Illinois Ave Urban Farm Stand's umbrella is no longer out for the season. However, we are still open by appointment or chance, for pickup of #local #fresh #sustainable #beyondorganic #regenerativeagriculture #urbanfarm goods!

Available All Year (Contact Us For Pickup): Lavender Wood For Grill Or Smoker, Dried "Jaune du Poitou" Stems/Blossoms For Arrangements, Dried Lavender Bundles, Hardwood Cutting Boards, House plants in take home pots, Hand-Embroidered Lavender-Stuffed Sachets, Seeds For Unique French and Polish Heirlooms, Lavender Fire Starters, Lovage Straws, Culinary and Medicinal Herb Plants in Biodegradable Rice Pots, and perennial/annual/permaculture plant starts. For example, don't miss starts of "White Soul" alpine strawberries.

Illinois Ave Urban Farm specializes in oca, sunchokes, medieval skirrets, culinary herbs, edible flowers, indigenous edibles, and Polish & French heirlooms. As archeologists and horticultural/agriculture historians, we love talking about ethnobotany, traditional cultural wisdom, and sustainability. Contact us to book presentations (by Zoom or otherwise) on #RegenerativeAgriculture, "Composting Methods", "Season Extension," "Vertical Gardening," "Compost, Soil, Water: Earth's Living Skin", and Heirloom Fruit Trees.

Seasonal Availability: Oca (a tuber from the Andes Mountains), Sunchokes, Medieval Skirrets, Winter Squash & Pumpkins, Summer Squash or Zucchini, Edible Flowers, Okra, Heirloom Garlic, Garlic Scapes, Mesclun or Head Lettuce, Kale, Swiss Chard, Mustard Greens, Baby or Rainbow Carrots, Snack Carrots, Jaune du Poitou Leek “Pearls”, Rhubarb, Fresh Herbs (Chocolate Mint, Oregano, Thyme, Parsley, Peppermint, Sage, Spearmint), Rose Hips, Cucumbers (Pickling, Straight 8, White, Lemon), Snap Beans, Currants, Gooseberries, Sugar Snap Peas, Garden (Shucking) Peas, Snow Peas, Alpine Strawberries, and More!

🥕U.S. Veteran on an Urban Farm
🥕 “Beyond Organic” (Grown “Regeneratively”)
🥕“Food Not Lawns” & Community Garden Advocate
🥕Unique Heirloom Veggies (French & Polish Specialties)

For those of you who have purchased oca locally from Illinois Ave Urban Farm to try for tuber harvest in our less than i...
11/06/2020
Permaculture Plants: Oca | Temperate Climate Permaculture

For those of you who have purchased oca locally from Illinois Ave Urban Farm to try for tuber harvest in our less than ideal climate, in the less than ideal northern hemisphere, a series of forecasted prolonged freezing temperatures at night after the second week of November can be fraught with gardener's angst.

"Should I dig the oca plants now?" "Should I leave them in the ground until Thanksgiving?" "How could I have set up the mulching, the row covers, the cold frames, the green house or other season extension better for good tuber size up and harvest?" "Should I have planted oca in pots that could be moved inside to warmer temperatures?"

As an urban farmer always hoping for a good yield of oca tubers to sell around this time of year, we rely on a couple of guides that offer advice to those of us in the northern hemisphere at the edge of this plant's optimal temperate climate growing range. This blog post from https://theunconventionalgardener.com/blog/how-to-grow-oca/ is interesting because it mentions a Guild of Oca Breeders working on a day neutral varietal. Intrepid plant breeders among you may want to add yourself to that number.

The Unconventional Gardener also mentions intercropping, which can useful both for protection of the plant from the Inland Northwest's summer sun and heat waves, as well as packing more into a small space urban garden. I've found that that frozen dead foliage of intercropped plants like tomatoes serves to protect oca from frosts (although rare from deep freezes). Next year, we may try intercropping with another of my permaculture farm stand cash crops that overwinters well with mulch, our rare "Jaune du Poitou" leeks. The Unconventional Gardener also has advice about storage of the crop saved for the next season at cold temps in breathable bags (we store ours in the a deli drawer in the refrigerator) and/or propagating plants from stem cuttings.

An extremely authoritative guide for the maritime Pacific Northwest (and the Inland Northwest is outside that range) is from Cultivariable at https://www.cultivariable.com/instructions/andean-roots-tubers/how-to-grow-oca/ Cultivariable is an "independent breeder and supplier of vegetable seeds, roots, tubers, and other plant material" and their science-based advice is stellar. Illinois Urban Farm relies on Cultivariable for almost all growing instructions. For example, their advice for not hilling plants is spot on (tried both ways). Instead, we now mulch young oca plants lightly in the early summer, and add more mulch as they grow. Then we add more mulch and a cold frame to protect them now large plants from fall deep freezes.

Often, our ground here in the Inland Northwest doesn't freeze completely until late November and any type of season extension extends the days over which tubers might bulk up. If your tubers don't bulk up this year, take a tip from the other recommended growing guides, and "Keep Calm And Grow Food." While grown as an annual here in the Inland Northwest, oca also makes a great temperature climate permaculture plant.

What does temperature climate permaculture mean? It primarily means that you will not have to repurchase oca (unless you want yet another varietal, as there are hundreds). http://tcpermaculture.com/site/2013/10/07/permaculture-plants-oca/ Oca is a plant that we can grow an annual, carefully managing the cultivation conditions for optimal tuber bulking, but can carry on through to the next season, with remarkably little assistance. Stored tubers may survive months in the refrigerator beyond expectation. Practically dead plants in pots can often be readily revived when given cool weather, partial shade, and abundant water. Oca is even hardy enough for some tubers to survive outside through a winter freeze (of course, the top foliage will be dead).

Similar to potatoes, you will find that many small tubers have amazingly survived an entire winter only to sprout in the late spring or summer. These volunteers can even be easily transplanted to the area you've sited your oca bed rotation for the year). Or, you can replant an oca crop from your safely stored tubers forgotten in the back of a refrigerator drawer. Or, you can propagate oca from tuber foliage from those plants that you may have taken inside in late fall. Somewhere on your property, outside or inside, there is sure to enough oca to safeguard a second or later harvest after a replanting.

Oca is definitely a "Don't Worry, Be Happy" permaculture suitable plant for the Inland Northwest. Oca foligage looks beautifully lush in the summer under the right conditions and yields greens for salads. Oca plants yield tubers virtually every year sufficient for culinary experimentation, and more years that not, harvests of jewel-like tubers big enough to share with others. That's #permaculturelife #thanksgiving #foodsustainability !

p.s., if you are intrigued by this temperate climate permaculture plant, we have oca for sale in large pots ready for you to take home for a Thanksgiving harvest. Save a few tubers for next year! Comment on this post or message us to inquire about this year's tuber harvest for your Thanksgiving table.

Oca is a beautiful, productive, and easy to grow tuber from the Andes. A perfect addition to a temperate climate forest garden.

Address

1817 E. Illinois Ave
Spokane, WA
99207

Telephone

(509) 328-2523

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Illinois Ave Urban Farm posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The Business

Send a message to Illinois Ave Urban Farm:

Videos

Category

Illinois Ave. Farm Stand

Freshly picked, beyond organic produce grown right in our northside Spokane Washington USA neighborhood. This page and our stand offer the seasonal bounty of the Earth, unusual and heirloom produce, occasional culinary recipes old and new, a little bit of local food network philosophy and classes, and hope for a more sustainable future amidst an increasingly urbanized global environment. When the farm stand umbrella is up in our driveway and you are looking for locally grown goods, just knock on the front door or holler at the back gate!

Proprietors Kathleen Callum and Robert Sloma are currently restoring a 1928 California style bungalow, advocate for Food Not Lawns on their own lawn and community garden, are archeologists, and have one son. Both grew up gardening, have helped the family make maple syrup at the Callum Sugarbush in New Hampshire, sold produce at a farmer’s market in New Hampshire, and a boutique organic restaurant in Vermont. They volunteered as community garden managers on Spokane’s northwest side, prior to its development by the non-profit who owned the land. Both are grateful to a V.A. loan, thanks to Kathleen’s service in the military, used to purchase their 1928 California Craftsman, which they are restoring.Now besides gardening on their own urban lot, and gleaning from their old Italian neighborhood trees, they rent a plot at the Chief Garry Community Garden.

Robert Sloma’s parents immigrated from Poland. He missed speaking Polish when he moved to Washington State, so was inspired to bring together Polish-Americans in the Inland Northwest through Spokolonia (an amalgam of Spokane and Polonia). Robert is passionate about heirloom tree fruit, works for a local tribe as an archeologist, and graduated from S.U.N.Y. Plattsburg and University of Leicester, England in Anthropology and Historical Archeology. One of his favorite facebook posts videos, , narrated in both Polish and English, demonstrates how to make caraway and juniper berry flavored naturally fermented sauerkraut the traditional way.

Kathleen graduated in Geology and Anthropology from University of Montana and Quaternary Studies from University of Maine (now the Institute for Climate Change), retired from U.S.D.A. after suffering a stroke, specializes in early agriculture and horticulture, is the President of Inland Northwest Community Gardens, volunteers as one of the WSU Master Gardeners-Spokane County, and is one of the Spokane County Master Composters/Recyclers. She is passionate about growing the local food network, community sustainability and resiliency, and #ClimateJustice. Gardening and taking care of Earth’s bounty helps inspire her and keeps her going.

Nearby restaurants


Other Food Stands in Spokane

Show All

Comments

The Spokane Food Policy Council has been hard at work this year developing action steps based on the food system survey we conducted. Your feedback on these action steps is invaluable to the future of the Spokane regional food system. Please join us for a collaborative community forum to discuss the next steps to cultivate a safe, local and sustainable food system for all! We want to hear your voice and your perspective no matter what part of the food system you represent – consumer, producer, distributor, processor or food waste recovery. We are offering two online Zoom session options: Monday - November 30, 2020 from 6-8 PM Friday - December 4, 2020 from 3-5 PM It's FREE! Register at: https://spokanefoodpolicy.org Participants will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win prizes! No purchase necessary. All Spokane County residents over age 18 are eligible to win. Chances of winning depend on the number of entries.
Thank you for all the wonderful veggies, flowers, and lavender smoking wood! Cant wait to cook with the Dinosaur Kale and variants of Okra! All of this for under $15! 😍
What a gem! 💚🌱🌻🥕🍓 I spent an amazing Sunday afternoon in Kathleen’s beautiful garden learning about heirloom vegetables and herbs, tasting delicious alpine strawberries (taste of my childhood!) and homemade mint ice tea :-). Kathleen made my culinary dream come true - I could finally honor the summer time with my favorite dish - young (new) potatoes with fresh dill and mizeria ( polish cucumber salad)! It tasted just like in Poland :-). 🤤 I was amazed how many different Polish fruits and vegetables I found in Illinois Ave Urban Farm! I came back home with delicious white currants, amazing rhubarb puree made by Kathleen and tasty garlic. My garden got a great addition of beautiful Tyborski Plum tomato plant (very excited about it!), lovage (lubczyk, which I could not find in any nursery) and danish cabbage. 💚💚💚 Kathleen's garden is foodie's heaven! I will definitely be back for more goodies and I highly recommend this wonderful urban farm to everyone. It is definitely worth stopping by! Thank you Kathleen and Robert for an amazing experience :-).☺️👩‍🌾🥔🍓🍅👨‍🌾🌱
Your tomatoes next to Bruce Springsteen's????!!!! Bruce GARDENS? How are the Boss' 'maters, anyway?? Do tell. Thanks.